People

Natalie Dawson

Job: Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Email: natalie.dawson.09@ucl.ac.uk

B.S. Degree: BSc (Hons) Bioinformatics, University of Manchester, 2008.

M.S. Degree: MRes Computational Biology, University of York, 2009.

PhD Degree: Computational Biology, University College London, 2014.

Bio: My PhD project involved the study of the microbes living in various environments inside the human body through metagenomic analysis. The human tongue was of particular interest to us as it is an environment that is very stable and that is not prone to bacterial disease. I used computational methods to analyse our metagenomic sequences: bacterial phylogenies were classified and in-house methods that predict protein domain function were improved. Through these methods we described the bacterial community structure and predicted what they are doing. We were also interested in finding novel enzymes that better catalyse a given reaction, and understanding how enzyme chemistry evolves. Finally, function predictions for enzymes of interest will be validated through experimental work.


Natalie Dawson

Job: Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Email: natalie.dawson.09@ucl.ac.uk

B.S. Degree: BSc (Hons) Bioinformatics, University of Manchester, 2008.

M.S. Degree: MRes Computational Biology, University of York, 2009.

PhD Degree: Computational Biology, University College London, 2014.

Bio: My PhD project involved the study of the microbes living in various environments inside the human body through metagenomic analysis. The human tongue was of particular interest to us as it is an environment that is very stable and that is not prone to bacterial disease. I used computational methods to analyse our metagenomic sequences: bacterial phylogenies were classified and in-house methods that predict protein domain function were improved. Through these methods we described the bacterial community structure and predicted what they are doing. We were also interested in finding novel enzymes that better catalyse a given reaction, and understanding how enzyme chemistry evolves. Finally, function predictions for enzymes of interest will be validated through experimental work.


Natalie Dawson

Job: Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Email: natalie.dawson.09@ucl.ac.uk

B.S. Degree: BSc (Hons) Bioinformatics, University of Manchester, 2008.

M.S. Degree: MRes Computational Biology, University of York, 2009.

PhD Degree: Computational Biology, University College London, 2014.

Bio: My PhD project involved the study of the microbes living in various environments inside the human body through metagenomic analysis. The human tongue was of particular interest to us as it is an environment that is very stable and that is not prone to bacterial disease. I used computational methods to analyse our metagenomic sequences: bacterial phylogenies were classified and in-house methods that predict protein domain function were improved. Through these methods we described the bacterial community structure and predicted what they are doing. We were also interested in finding novel enzymes that better catalyse a given reaction, and understanding how enzyme chemistry evolves. Finally, function predictions for enzymes of interest will be validated through experimental work.


Natalie Dawson

Job: Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Email: natalie.dawson.09@ucl.ac.uk

B.S. Degree: BSc (Hons) Bioinformatics, University of Manchester, 2008.

M.S. Degree: MRes Computational Biology, University of York, 2009.

PhD Degree: Computational Biology, University College London, 2014.

Bio: My PhD project involved the study of the microbes living in various environments inside the human body through metagenomic analysis. The human tongue was of particular interest to us as it is an environment that is very stable and that is not prone to bacterial disease. I used computational methods to analyse our metagenomic sequences: bacterial phylogenies were classified and in-house methods that predict protein domain function were improved. Through these methods we described the bacterial community structure and predicted what they are doing. We were also interested in finding novel enzymes that better catalyse a given reaction, and understanding how enzyme chemistry evolves. Finally, function predictions for enzymes of interest will be validated through experimental work.